Support

Support Groups for People With Pancreatic Cancer

Connect with other people with pancreatic cancer, share information, and find support.

To learn about a 12-week telephone support group, visit cancercare.org, the website of CancerCare. (Be sure to check out their other resources, including counseling, workshops, and more, here.)This link is to a third-party website.

Read more at cancercare.org This link is to a third-party website.

To learn about in-person support and networking groups visit pancan.org, the website of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. (Note that it may not be a comprehensive list and calling ahead is recommended.)

One-to-One Support With Patient Central

Patient Central is the centralized service of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. Patient Central was formerly known as Patient and Liaison Services (PALS). Their free-of-charge services include information about treatment options, clinical trials, specialist physicians, diet and nutrition, and more. The same person will help you every time you call.

To learn more about Patient Central services, visit pancan.org, the website of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. (On the same page, you can click through to request educational materials at no charge, including helpful tips about getting organized after diagnosis, and more.)

Support Groups, Networks, and Other Resources

Connect with other patients, survivors, and caregivers in a way that meets your personal preferences.

To learn more about the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s Survivor and Caregiver Network, their educational events, support and networking groups, and more, visit pancan.org, the website of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

Online Social Community & Discussions

For an online social network, consider joining a leading community for people with pancreatic cancer and caregivers who seek information, inspiration, and support after diagnosis.

To learn more about the Cancer Support Community social community and information center, visit CancerSupportCommunity.org.

Counseling for People With Pancreatic Cancer

Counseling can help patients learn new ways to cope with cancer, manage emotions, and improve communications both with their healthcare teams and with their families.

To learn more about free telephone counseling services available nationwide, visit cancercare.org, the website of CancerCare.

The Survivor and Caregiver Network

Share information, ask questions, and gain support and inspiration by talking to others with similar experiences through the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s Survivor and Caregiver Network.

To learn more about how the Survivor and Caregiver Network works, and to listen to one survivor’s thoughts on its value, visit pancan.org, the website of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network.

Support Groups for Caregivers of People With Pancreatic Cancer

Connect with other caregivers, share experiences and information, and find support.

To learn about a 15-week online support group, led by an oncology social worker, visit cancercare.org, the website of CancerCare. (Be sure to check out their other resources (including counseling, workshops, and more) here.)This link is to a third-party website.

Read more at cancercare.orgThis link is to a third-party website.

To learn about in-person support and networking groups visit pancan.org, the website of the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network. Many of the groups welcome caregivers, family, and friends of people with pancreatic cancer. (Note that it may not be a comprehensive list and calling ahead is recommended.)

Coping With Loss and Grief

Sometimes loss will happen. The bereaved who remain are undergoing a life-changing experience and may need time and assistance to make sense of a new life and identity.

For tips and suggestions for coping with loss, whether for yourself or someone you know, visit cancer.org, the website of the American Cancer Society. (Click the Topics menu at the top of the page to access articles on related subjects.)

Read more at cancer.org This link is to a third-party website.

For practical ideas for coping with the death of a partner or spouse, visit cancercare.org, the website of CancerCare. (At the bottom of the page are links to other pages with suggestions for grieving the loss of a parent or child.)

Supportive Cancer Dos and Don’ts

Cancer can be a frightening disease and many people who care don’t know what to say to someone who is living with a cancer diagnosis. Generally, the most important thing you can do is mention the situation in some way that feels comfortable for you.

For suggestions on how to speak with someone you know that has cancer, visit cancer.net, the website of the American Cancer Society.

Read more on cancer.org This link is to a third-party website.

Read 16 Supportive Dos and Don’ts When Someone You Know Has Cancer