Mental Health

Mental Health: Coping With Distress

A certain amount of distress is normal when you or a loved one has cancer. You may feel unsafe, vulnerable, and afraid. Such feelings often last through treatment, and even beyond. But how do you tell how much distress is beyond what is expected and if you’re being affected more than others.

For a thorough discussion of distress, including tools for measuring it, ideas for coping with it, and how to tell if you could use assistance in dealing with it, visit cancer.org, the website of the American Cancer Society.

Read more at cancer.org This link is to a third-party website.

You may also want to take the online class “Keeping Well in Mind, Body, and Spirit.”

Start “Keeping Well in Mind, Body, and Spirit” This link is to a third-party website.

Mental Health: Coping with Anxiety

Cancer can affect you in many ways. It may not only cause physical issues, but it may affect your emotions. It may make you feel anxious or depressed.

Some days it may feel like you’re facing these issues alone. But you’re not alone. Your healthcare team, family, friends, and cancer support groups are there to help you through this tough time.

Anxiety may cause people to feel very frightened, upset, or worried. It can make it hard to perform daily activities like shopping for groceries or going to work.

Depression may cause people to feel very sad. It may make it hard to concentrate or difficult to sleep. Depression may also make you feel like all you want to do is sleep. Like anxiety, people who feel depressed may find it hard to do everyday activities.

Anxiety and depression can be serious problems that can only be diagnosed by your doctor. Talk with your doctor or nurse about your emotional needs. They can help you find the resources you need to get help.

You may also want to take the online class “Keeping Well in Mind, Body, and Spirit”

Start “Keeping Well in Mind, Body, and Spirit” This link is to a third-party website.